Library

Biology Web Resources

Artificial Anatomy    http://americanhistory.si.edu/anatomy/bodyparts/nma03_bodyparts.html
Test your knowledge of anatomy.  The National Museum of American History at the Smithsonian has created this site for those who find the repugnance of the dissecting room difficult to overcome.  Using a papier-mache anatomical model named "Jerome", users are asked to place the correct part of Jerome's anatomy on the model under the "body parts" link. 

BioMed Central: http://www.biomedcentral.com/gateways/systemsbiology/
"BioMed Central is an STM (Science, Technology and Medicine) publisher which has pioneered the open access publishing model.  All original research articles published by BioMed Central are made freely and permanently accessible online immediately upon publication. BioMed Central views open access to research as essential in order to ensure the rapid and efficient communication of research findings."

CELLS Alive!:  http://www.cellsalive.com/cell_cycle.htm
CELLS alive! represents 30 years of capturing film and computer-enhanced images of living cells and organisms for education and medical research. The site has been available continuously and updated annually since May of 1994 and now hosts over 4 million visitors a year.

Cell Migration Gateway: http://www.cellmigration.org/aboutus/about.shtml
"The Cell Migration Gateway is a comprehensive and free online resource that is the result of a collaboration between the Cell Migration Consortium (CMC) and Nature Publishing Group, aimed at helping users keep abreast of developments in the field of migration research.  Cell Migration Updates are intended to provide a one-stop overview of the latest research in cell migration for specialists and non-specialists alike.

Center for Molecular Modeling (NIH): http://cmm.cit.nih.gov/modeling/
"The Center for Molecular Modeling is part of the Division of Computational Bioscience (DCB/CIT) of the National Institutes of Health. Their research involves the development and application of theoretical and computational methodologies, from ab initio quantum mechanics calculations of small organic molecules to molecular mechanics simulations of macromolecular systems. Their interests include the modeling of macromolecular structure, dynamics and thermodynamics, structure-function relationships of proteins, the treatment of solvation effects, enzyme mechanism, and ligand binding."

Emory University Human Anatomy Dept.  http://www.emory.edu/ANATOMY/Contents.html
This site contains course materials including helpful study guides on human anatomy.

Human Anatomy Online  http://www.innerbody.com/htm/body.html
Click on each human figure to see anatomical systems.  Pick points and zoom for location and explanation of body organ/system.

Medline Plus  http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus
The National Institute of Health has created a site with over 800 health topics.  Search by location/systems, disorders and conditions; diagnosis and therapy; demographic groups, and health and wellness topics.  This site is updated regularly.

Pennsylvania State University Human Anatomy (Bio 129) http://homes.bio.psu.edu/people/faculty/strauss/anatomy/biology29.htm
Dr. James Strauss of Penn State's Biology Dept. has created this excellent site to view the various body systems.

Scirus:  http://www.scirus.com/
"Scirus is the most comprehensive scientific research tool on the web. With over 350 million scientific items indexed at last count, it allows researchers to search for not only journal content but also scientists' homepages, courseware, pre-print server material, patents and institutional repository and website information."

UC Berkeley's General Human Anatomy Webcast (IB 131) 
http://webcast.berkeley.edu/course_details.php?seriesid=1906978375
Download Professor Marian Diamond's general human anatomy lectures from this lecture archive.

 

Copyright (C) 2010 Napa Valley College                                                By:  Napa Valley College Library
Last updated:  Sept., 2010                                                                      Questions & Comments: Nancy McEnery